Owo Soup Recipe

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Owo soup is one of the most cherished soups of the Itsekiris, Isokos and Urhobos of Delta state. It is mostly cooked during festive seasons…especially when giving out a daughter’s hand in marriage. A marriage ceremony without this soup is questionable. This is the soup most guests look forward to as most modern homes hardly cook it.

I can boldly tell you that more than 70% of the ladies from the tribes mentioned above shy away from preparing this soup. 😀 It can make or break you as a correct delta cook but I am here to make it easy for you 😉

 

6

Now let’s cook!

1
Cook your meat with just salt and seasoning cubes. No onion, curry, thyme etc pleeeeeeease. Doing this will spoil your soup. Stick to just salt and seasoning cubes.

2
In a clean pot, pour about 1.5 litres of water. Set the pot over heat and sieve 3 handfuls of yellow garri (only yellow garri please) into the pot while stirring with a wooden spatula.

3
Stir until it is boiling and looks silky. You can add a little table salt and seasoning cubes.

4
Now add the cooked meat and stock to the pot containing the silky garri mix. Some dried pepper, crayfish and urheri. Leave to cook for a few minutes. See what Urheri looks like here. Make sure to flatten the urheri with something heavy (kitchen mallet, pestle, grinding stone etc.) then take out the seeds and rinse them before using.

7
Pour the periwinkles into the pot if using. The Itekiris love their periwinkles but the Isokohs/Urhobos like theirs plain.

8
Some dried fish, blend in, turn down the heat and allow to boil.

6
While the soup is left boiling, pound some native salt into powder. We will use about a teaspoon. Click to see The Difference between Akaun and White Native Salt.

9
In a clean bowl, pour in the teaspoon of native salt.2 handful of starch and 2 cooking spoons of native palm oil. I used the very thick part at the bottom of my oil gallon as I could not find the Urhobo native palm oil. The Urhobo native palm oil takes this soup to another level. The colour is sharper and yum. :-). Add a cup of warm water and blend it all together until it flows freely.

10
Now pour the mixture into the boiling pot and stir quickly with the wooden spatula. Stop pouring the mixture once it gets to your desired thickness. If you made it too thick, add some warm water to loosen it up. Adjust salt and seasoning to taste.

11
Ahhhhhh! Babes oya make una come fan me with fan. Clean my sweat with handkerchief too. 🙂 I don save una o! 🙂 If your hubby or boo praises you, use style style come and praise me too o! 😀Allow to blend in nicely over flame for a few more minutes and your soup is ready. Turn off the heat, let it rest or a while, stir once more and serve

owoh dpOwoh Soup

STARCHStarch

Serve with starch, boiled unripe plantain or yam.

Kai! Yellow + Yellow = LG (Life’s Good) 😀

NB:
* The Urhobo/Itsekiri/Isokoh owoh soup is yellow in colour not red.
* The oil blends in nicely. It does not have oil floating around it.
* It looks creamy.
* Too much crayfish darkens the soup.
* Never cover the pot while cooking.

Enjoy!

culled from matsecooks

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